THEORETICAL FEMINISM

Hello everyone,

 

Another day, another dollar. Here we are again, all of us. It’s nice to think of everyone working together, falling into the category of human as one. I was thinking today about some of the divisions of the sexes that exist, and came across some divisions of feminism that I didn’t know about. Did you know that there is an area called Cyborg Feminism? It’s quite interesting. Pretty much, it begs the question about “what is natural?” In terms of menstruation, cyborg feminism would be more likely to embrace synthetic menstruation suppressing drugs, where as, say, eco feminism would not, because those feminists see the drugs as unnatural.

This idea of conflicting feminist ideologies is really interesting to me, because a lot of the feminists involved all want the same thing through different means. Take liberal feminism versus radical feminism, for example. Liberal feminism typically is pro-choice, and in favor of giving women more options. The whole “equal work, equal pay” motto evolves out of this ideology. Radical feminism, on the other hand, embraces the idea that women have needs that differ from men, and that the workplace should be more inclusive in its scheduling to achieve this goal. To give an example, liberal feminism would probably look at pregnancy in the work place as a situation where women work within the jobs requirements as much as possible until the birth of the child, then a recovery period, then give the option as soon as possible for the woman to go back to work (I should probably note 2 things here. 1) is that I am making extensions based on my understanding about feminist theories, and I recommend you look into it yourself if my ideas seem wrong, and 2) the phrase “liberal feminism” does not refer to the belief of all people with liberal mindsets—It is quite possible that liberals, in the political sense, disagree with liberal feminist theory. Ok, back to what I was talking about). This liberal theory basically give the woman time off for birth, but really no time to raise the child. The theory shapes and justifies this position by claiming that they are “empowering” women with more choices.

To contrast this, radical feminism would expect the system to change, rather than the women within the system, to accommodate this pregnancy. A radical feminist would probably argue that a woman should work while she was capable of working, but once she began showing the need to remove herself for her personal health, she should be able to leave. A radical feminist also would probably be more interested in pressing for paid maternity leave. I think, in this scenario, I am more on the side of the radical feminist—family is important to shape properly and in a healthy manner. But there are some things I disagree with. For example, I think that menstrual-suppression drugs are something that do many women good—for example, those with irregular period or extremely painful ones. It’s good to look at things from more than an open-and-shut perspective. What do you think?

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One thought on “THEORETICAL FEMINISM

  1. I like your explanation I don’t think alot of people think about there being a difference between the different types of feminists! Good insight!

    Liked by 1 person

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